Lorraine Forrest-Turner

Placing the apostrophe with joint possession

02 Dec / by: Lorraine Forrest-Turner

It’s not always obvious where to place the apostrophe with joint possession. Single possession is relatively easy. “I’m spending the week at my uncle’s house.” But what happens if your aunt and uncle own the house together?

Is it “I’m spending the week at my aunt’s and uncle’s house” or “I’m spending the week at my aunts and uncle’s house” or “I’m spending the week at my aunt and uncle’s house”?

All of these are correct – in different circumstances.

The first implies you’re spending the week at two houses – your aunt’s house and your uncle’s house.

The second that you’re spending the week at the house owned by your uncle and your two (or more) aunts.

And the third that you’re spending the week at the house your aunt and uncle share. When something is owned jointly, you only use one apostrophe.

Photo by Amador Loureiro on Unsplash

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Lorraine is a trainer for the PRCA
Lorraine is a trainer for the PRCA
Lorraine is a member of the Professional Copywriters' Network
Lorraine is a trainer for Big Fish Training